LPI Central Europe at Chemnitzer Linux Days

March 10, 2018

LPI Central Europe at Chemnitzer Linux Days

March 10 - 11, 2018

Linux Professional Institute (LPI) Central Europe invites you to Chemnitzer Linux Days March 10 - 11, 2018 in Chemnitz, Germany. LPI CE is thrilled to support Chemnitzer Linux Days 2018. Chemnitzer Linux-Tage is organized because we want to give people an understanding of Linux and Open Source. The team is constantly looking for enthusiastic volunteers. In case you also like to organise huge events, are reliable and interested, please get in touch with us and contribute!

Join the Conversation

On Sunday, March 11, join Fabian Thorns, Director of Certification at Linux Professional Institute as he provides a general introduction to licenses for open source and free software.

Save on Exams!

As part of the Chemnitzer Linux Tage, Linux Professional Institute certification exams will be offered again this year as well as the Univention LPI-198 examination. Write an LPIC paper-based exam for 90 €, a Linux Essentials exam for 60 €, the new DevOps Tools Engineer certification exam for 90 € or the Univention LPI-198 exam for 85€.

The language is selected at the time of registration. Prices are in addition to the admission fees. The amount has to be paid in cash. Meeting point for all participants is 15 minutes before the start in the exam room.

Registration

Due to the limited number of places available for LPI exams, you need to register to write your exam. For further questions regarding the offered exams, please do not hesitate to contact info(at)lpice.eu. You will find further information at the websites Linux Professional Institute and LPI Central Europe.

LPI at the 16th Annual Southern California Linux Expo

March 8, 2018

LPI at the 16th Annual Southern California Linux Expo

March 8 – 11, 2018

Linux Professional Institute (LPI) invites you connect with them at Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE) taking place March 8 – 11, 2018 in Pasadena, California. LPI is thrilled to be supporting and showcasing again this year at SCALE. LPI will be hosting exam cram and exam lab sessions during SCALE.

Hone Your Skills.

The Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE) is sponsored by the Linux Expo of Southern California Inc. SCALE’s mission is to provide educational opportunities on the topic of Open Source software. Open Source software is any software that meets the litmus test of the OSI (Open Source Initiative). The target audiences are both current and potential users of OSS. Those users can be individual computer users, educational institutions, or businesses.

Join Our Complimentary Cram Sessions.

Register for one of our free cram sessions being held on Friday, March 9! Each session will be lead by a LPI certified trainer that will be able to field technical questions and help prepare you before you take the exam. Participate and learn more about our certifications and exam structure. Come prepared with questions!

Linux Essentials Cram Session
Friday, March 9
10:00am - 11:00am
Presented by: Mike Weilgart, Vertical Sysadmin
Exam Objectives
REGISTER

LPIC-1 Cram Session
Friday, March 9
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Presented by: Kenny Armstrong, Linux Academy
Exam Objectives
REGISTER

DevOps Tool Engineer Cram Session
Friday, March 9
3:30pm - 5:30pm
Presented by: Aleksey Tsalolikhin, Vertical Sysadmin
Exam Objectives
REGISTER

Save on Certifications.

Register now for one of our exam times and take advantage of the discount exclusive to SCALE attendees on all LPI certifications. While at SCALE, write the Linux for $65 USD,  DevOps Tools Engineer for $99 USD or a LPIC for $99 USD.

Saturday, March 10 - Exam Lab
Register! Session 1: 9:00am - 12:00pm
Register! Session 2: 2:00pm - 5:00pm

Sunday, March 11 - Exam Lab
Register! Session 1: 9:00am - 12:00pm
Register! Session 2: 2:00pm - 5:00pm

Please arrive on time to sign in and obtain instructions. You are required to bring your LPI ID number and a piece of government issued ID.

“SCALE remains one of the best Linux and open source community events in North America . This conference has been a long time partner and promoter of open source and we're happy to be back again this year" - G. Matthew Rice, Executive Director, Linux Professional Institute

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DevOps Tools Introduction #07: Container Orchestration

February 20, 2018 - by Fabian Thorns

While individual Docker containers usually run a single program, applications in a microservice architecture are usually composed by combining multiple containers; each contributing a specific set of features that make up the complete application. Coordinating the creation and maintenance of the containers that build an application is the task of container orchestration tools. Multiple container orchestration platforms exist. However, two of them are part of the LPI DevOps Tools Engineer exam; Docker Swarm, which is part of Docker, and Kubernetes, which is its own container orchestration platform.

Docker Swarm is a simple clustering tool which, nowadays, is included in Docker. While Swarm allows you to connect multiple Docker hosts, Docker Compose provides features to describe application stacks containing more than one container and run these stacks on a Docker host or a Swarm cluster.

To learn about setting up a Swarm cluster, how to create a Docker Compose file and how to run your service on a Swarm cluster, spend a few hours and take the Container Orchestration with Docker and Swarm workshop by Jérôme Petazzoni. It explains Swarm and Compose in a clear, understandable and hands-on way. The slides encourage you to use Play with Docker, a service we already used last week. After logging in using your Docker ID, Play with Docker grants you access to up to five Docker nodes in the cloud and facilitates access to their exposed ports. Don’t just read the slides, spend the time to follow all the exercises and examples on your own. It is definitely worth it!

Kubernetes is an alternative tool for container orchestration. Originally developed by Google, Kubernetes is becoming more and more popular and is integrated with numerous other container platform products. Setting up a Kubernetes Cluster is not as simple as creating a Docker Swarm. Fortunately, the LPI DevOps Tools Engineer objectives do not ask you to set up Kubernetes. Instead, you’re expected to work with an existing Kubernetes setup.

Even better, there is the Kubernetes Basics Tutorial which guides you through your first major steps with Kubernetes. Each course module contains an interactive tutorial where you’re working with Kubernetes in a terminal in your web browser.

Similar to Play with Docker, Play with Kubernetes provides you with a free Kubernetes playground in your web browser. To create your own Kubernetes playground, consider using a hosted Kubernetes service. If you want to install Kubernetes locally, take a look at Minikube or CoreOS Container Linux.

If you enjoyed learning Docker Swarm with the Docker Orchestration workshop, you’ll be happy to hear that Jérôme Petazzoni, together with AJ Bowen, also offers a workshop titled Deploying and Scaling Microservices with Docker and Kubernetes. It is definitely worth the time to learn how to deploy the workshop’s example app, a distributed ‘Dockercoin’ miner, on Kubernetes.

Since Kubernetes uses its own orchestration model, take some time to get the terminology and concepts correct. Make sure you read the Pod Overview, Pods Details and Pod Lifecycle chapters of the Kubernetes Documentation. The exam objectives also explicitly mention Deployments, ReplicaSets and Services as important configuration elements in Kubernetes.

In order to give these concepts more context, visit the Task section of the Kubernetes documentation. Here you’ll find groups of common tasks, including instructions how to approach them. Browse the sections and tasks and try to follow some of the procedures that seem useful to you.

We’ve covered a huge amount of knowledge this week. Once you worked through all the references, you’ll be familiar with all the key aspects of deploying containerized applications and services. Next week we’ll focus on the other end of containers and see which infrastructure is required to run Docker on your local devices, in your data center and in the cloud.

About Fabian Thorns:

Fabian Thorns

Fabian Thorns is the Director of Certification Development at Linux Professional Institute, LPI. He is M.Sc. Business Information Systems, a regular speaker at open source events and the author of numerous articles and books. Fabian has been part of the exam development team since 2010. Connect with him on LinkedIn, XING or via email (fthorns at lpi.org).

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DevOps Tools Introduction #06: Container Basics

February 13, 2018 - by Fabian Thorns

Container virtualization is one of the major technologies behind modern software architectures. While the concept of container virtualization is rather old, new tools extend the pure virtualization components with numerous features that facilitate the deployment of containerized software. Docker is the most prominent project in that field. Objective 702.1 of the DevOps Tools Engineer certification focuses entirely on container virtualization using Docker.

To get started with Docker, visit the Play with Docker Classroom. Here you’ll find practical exercises which give you access to a remote Docker installation so you can start right away. To access the interactive labs, you’ll need a Docker ID which you can create for free at Docker Hub.

Once you got your Docker ID, you can choose to follow the operator’s or developer’s walk-through. Both tracks contain a lot of explanations and practical exercises. To ensure you capture all the knowledge in there, I recommend following both tutorial series. Furthermore, I highly recommend joining Jérôme Petazzoni and AJ Bowen in their comprehensive Introduction to Docker and Containers.

After completing the Play with Docker labs and working through the Docker workshop slides, open the original Docker documentation to dig into some of Docker’s details. Start with the Docker overview. Then, follow up with the major components of a container, which are networks, storage and volumes.

You should also review the Dockerfile reference and familiarize yourself with all of its options. To make sure your Dockerfiles rock, take a look at the best practices for Dockerfiles.

Comprehensive information on how to build a Dockerfile is available in the docker build reference documentation. Once you’re already in the command line reference, take this opportunity to also review all the docker commands you used in the previous exercises. Experiment with what else these commands can do. You don’t have to read the whole reference, just make certain that you’re comfortable with the tasks that the LPI objectives require you to perform.

The resources, mentioned today, occasionally talk about Docker Swarm. Bookmark these references for next week, when we’ll come to the details of Docker Swarm, Kubernetes and container orchestration.

About Fabian Thorns:

Fabian Thorns

Fabian Thorns is the Director of Certification Development at Linux Professional Institute, LPI. He is M.Sc. Business Information Systems, a regular speaker at open source events and the author of numerous articles and books. Fabian has been part of the exam development team since 2010. Connect with him on LinkedIn, XING or via email (fthorns at lpi.org).

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DevOps Tools Introduction #05: Continuous Delivery

February 6, 2018 - by Fabian Thorns

Turning source code into running services requires a series of steps. Continuous Integration (CI) and Continuous Delivery (CD) are key concepts behind automating, as much as possible, build and deployment processes. LPI covers CI/CD in objective 701.4. Martin Fowler offers an introduction to Continuous Delivery as well as some more background on Continuous Integration and Deployment Pipelines.

The deployment of artifacts that are built and tested in a CI/CD pipeline is a key process for supporting a DevOps environment. Besides the design of the CI/CD pipeline, several release and deployment models exist that try to further limit the risk of deployments and provide ways to roll back to previous versions. Some of these models which are extremely powerful when used with microservers and containers are Canary releases and Blue-green deployments. Christian Posta’s blog offers another great comparision of these models.

The LPI DevOps Tools Engineer objectives expect you to be able to implement CI/CD with Jenkins. To quickly get a Jenkins playground, you can install Jenkins locally as described in the Getting Started Guide that we’ll open in a minute. Alternatively, you can give the jenkins Docker image a try. Given that you have Docker running, use the following command to start the container and forward port 8080 from your host system:

docker run -p 8080:8080 jenkins

During the startup of the container you’ll see a lot of logging information. Amongst this information is the initial password. Copy this password and navigate to http://localhost:8080/. You’ll find Jenkins asking you for that password. Choose ‘Install suggested plugins’ and wait a few minutes while Jenkins is set up. You can follow Jenkins’ progress in the terminal where you started your container.

In the meantime, open the Guided Tour offered by the Jenkins project. This tutorial walks you through the setup of a build pipeline in Jenkins. Note that this tutorial sets up a Multibranch Pipeline which requires you to keep your Jenkinsfile in an SCM repository. If you want to make your first steps without involving SCM, create a Pipeline project instead and specify the content of your Jenkinsfile during the setup of the project. To simplify your setup even more, get started by using echo jobs in your Pipeline instead of real jobs which require additional files and configuration. Then, you can extend your pipeline with real functionality as you proceed.

In addition to following the Guided Tour, read some general instructions about how to use a Jenkinsfile, learn about the Pipeline Syntax and the language elements that the Pipeline plugin provides. Both documents might answer a lot of questions that may arise during the Guided Tour.

Finally, make sure you understand how Jenkins integrates with an SCM such as Git. Most of this functionality is provided by Jenkins Plugins. Jenkins hosts a plugin catalogue. Here you can find additional information on Jenkins plugins, such as those mentioned in the exam objectives (Git, Docker Pipeline, Docker Build and Publish, Copy Artifact, Fingerprint and Credentials). Next week, when you'll become familiar with Docker, come back to Jenkins and explore how to use Docker container within your CI pipeline.

About Fabian Thorns:

Fabian Thorns

Fabian Thorns is the Director of Certification Development at Linux Professional Institute, LPI. He is M.Sc. Business Information Systems, a regular speaker at open source events and the author of numerous articles and books. Fabian has been part of the exam development team since 2010. Connect with him on LinkedIn, XING or via email (fthorns at lpi.org).

LPI Central Europe at FOSDEM 2018

February 3, 2018

LPI Central Europe at FOSDEM 2018

February 3-4, 2018
Hone your skills. Save on exams. Tap into the open source community.

Linux Professional Institute (LPI) Central Europe invites you to FOSDEM 2018 taking place February 3-4, 2018 in Brussels, Belgium. LPI is thrilled to support FOSDEM 2018 as a Certification Partner.

Hone Your Skills

FOSDEM is a free and non-commercial event organised by the community for the community. The goal is to provide free and open source software developers and communities a place to get in touch with other developers and projects, be informed about the latest developments in the free software and open source world, to promote the development and benefits of free software and open source solutions.

Save on Exams!

Linux Professional Institute will offer a discount to examination candidates at FOSDEM 2018. The Linux Essentials, DevOps, Level 1, Level 2 and Level 3 exams are offered at a discount of nearly 50%. Visit the following link to find additional information on what examinations will be offered and procedures for registering.

Registration

Due to the limited number of places available for LPI exams, you need to register to write your exam.

For further questions regarding the offered exams, please do not hesitate to contact info(at)lpice.eu. You will find further information at the websites Linux Professional Institute and LPI Central Europe.

LPI Brazil Presenting at Campus Party

January 30, 2018

LPI Brazil Presenting at Campus Party

January 30 - February 4, 2018

Linux Professional Institute (LPI) Latin America invites you to join them at Campus Party Brazil taking place January 30 - February 4, 2018 in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

With more than 400,000 registered attendees all over the world, Campus Party is the greatest technological experience of the world. 75% of their events are held in Latin America, with the most recent one in Sao Paulo. Campus Party brings together young geeks in a festival of innovation, creativity, science, entrepreneurship & entertainment.

Learn about Linux Professional Institute Certification

Speak with local Linux Professional Institute Partners and learn about LPI exam certifications and how a career in open source creates opportunity for you!!

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DevOps Tools Introduction #04: Source Code Management

January 30, 2018 - by Fabian Thorns

Storing work results and sharing them with colleagues is an essential part of open source and DevOps culture. Source Code Management (SCM) and version control systems ensure all members of a team stay on top of changes to source code and related files. These tools are also crucial in coordinating parallel work on different features and the integration of the features for software releases. In addition to source code, SCM is often used to manage configuration files as well. Putting the configuration of cloud services under version control facilitates the deployment of an application significantly.

The LPI DevOps Tools Engineer exam dedicates the entire objective 701.3 to SCM and places Git front and center.

Get your hands dirty with Git as soon as you can by navigating to tryGit. You’ll be guided through a series of exercises which you’ll have to complete in a terminal embedded in the website. Make sure you also pay attention to the file browser and advice box underneath the terminal.

Git itself provides comprehensive documentation in the form of a free ebook. If English is not your native language, make sure to check the left menu of the book’s page for existing translations. In case you’re new to Git, you certainly want to read the Getting Started and Git Basics chapters. You might consider continuing to work through the book or skip directly to those features that the exam objectives explicitly mention, such as tags, branchesmerging and submodules.

Chapter seven of the Git book introduces you to a series of useful and advanced features of Git. Browse through all the pages of this chapter and also review the entire Appendix C which summarizes the Git commands used in the book.

To wrap up this subject, spend some time and determine how Git integrates with your favorite development or administration tools. To get a feeling for how other projects use Git, find the repositories of a few free software projects you use and explore how these projects manage their development and releases.

Finally, LPI expects you to understand the differences between centralized and distributed SCM and to be aware of Apache Subversion and CVS. Learning about the differences between these SCM tools easily gets into opinion-based discussions which makes finding objective information difficult. Be aware of that during your studies. A well-balanced article by Zvonko Biškup on Git vs. SVN might be a good place to get started. You should also consider reading Martin Flower’s overview of version control tools.

Popper version control is the base for successful DevOps. Once source code and configuration files are put under version control, build tools can retrieve them to start automated builds, tests and deployment. We will learn more about this next week, when we’ll discuss continuous integration and continuous delivery.

About Fabian Thorns:

Fabian Thorns

Fabian Thorns is the Director of Certification Development at Linux Professional Institute, LPI. He is M.Sc. Business Information Systems, a regular speaker at open source events and the author of numerous articles and books. Fabian has been part of the exam development team since 2010. Connect with him on LinkedIn, XING or via email (fthorns at lpi.org).

LPI Exhibiting at Developers Conference CZ

January 26, 2018

LPI Exhibiting at Developers Conference CZ

January 26 - 28, 2018

Attending Developers Conference CZ? Linux Professional Institute (LPI) Central Europe invites you to visit them at their booth during the upcoming, sold out, Developers Conference CZ taking place January 26 - 28, 2018 at the Faculty of Information Technology (VUT FIT - Božetěchova 2, Brno).

DevConf.cz 2018 is the 10th annual, free, Red Hat sponsored community conference for developers, admins, DevOps engineers, testers, documentation writers and other contributors to open source technologies such as Linux, Middleware, Virtualization, Storage, Cloud and mobile where FLOSS communities sync, share, and hack on upstream projects together in the beautiful city of Brno, Czech Republic.

Learn about Linux Professional institute Certification

Speak with local Linux Professional Institute Partners and learn about LPI exam certifications and how you can sign up to write yours!

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DevOps Tools Introduction #03: Cloud Components and Platforms

January 23, 2018 - by Fabian Thorns

Equipped with knowledge about modern software development and architectures, we will focus on building blocks of such applications. Objective 701.2 of LPI’s DevOps Tool Engineer exam covers software components and platforms. The objective mentions a number of technology components such as object stores, relational and NoSQL databases, message brokers and big data services. Everyone working in IT for some time will likely know at least one tool in each of these categories. Likewise, a general understanding about the roles of these components in a software architecture is essential knowledge.

While these application components used to be installed manually by a system administrator when preparing the installation of a software, nowadays cloud providers offer the instantaneous provisioning of these tools as a service. Most cloud providers leverage existing technologies and integrate them in their interfaces. Each cloud ecosystem uses distinct names to refer to the resulting products.  This practice makes it hard to remember all the terminology when using a new cloud platform. Since LPI focuses on open technologies, OpenStack was chosen as a reference implementation.

The focus of this objective is the understanding of the functionality of the respective services and their role in an application architecture. This knowledge is not specific to OpenStack or any other cloud provider. The OpenStack Project Navigator is a great place to get insight into the names used in the LPI objectives. Here you’ll find links to the respective projects and can learn more about them.

If you already have a preferred cloud provider, don’t forget to check out their matching products and offers. Again, this topic is about the functionality of these kinds of tools, not about the implementation details of how OpenStack was developed.

In addition to service components, the topic also mentions Platform as a Service (PaaS) and content delivery networks. In the case of PaaS, CloudFoundry and OpenShift are named. Feature overviews are provided by CloudFoundry as well as OpenShift. Again, keep in mind that this objective tests your understanding of the functionality of these projects. You’re not supposed to become an expert in either of these platforms.

I can’t finish this posting without admitting that the first postings of this series required a lot of reading. But no worries -- we’ll finally get our hands dirty on the command line next week, when we’ll learn about source code management and how to use Git.

About Fabian Thorns:

Fabian Thorns

Fabian Thorns is the Director of Certification Development at Linux Professional Institute, LPI. He is M.Sc. Business Information Systems, a regular speaker at open source events and the author of numerous articles and books. Fabian has been part of the exam development team since 2010. Connect with him on LinkedIn, XING or via email (fthorns at lpi.org).

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